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Creative Writing / Malikhaing Pagsulat

Designed to provide you with rich and stimulating learning experiences that will help you communicate better in English that goes out of normal professional.

primary resources

character

narration

read

write

research

anecdotes

vivid setting

underlying theme

metaphors

short stories

screenplays

education

The examples of fiction are biography, memoir, travelogue and journal.

English Conversation About A Creati...
English Conversation About A Creative Person
  • True
  • False

You looked pretty ugly in that dress.

  • Alliteration
  • Oxymoron
  • Palindrome
  • Metaphor

In this part, you are deciding what kind of story you want to tell to the audience. You help the understand how to interpret the relationships and events they see.

  • Deciding on Your Play’s Structure
  • Writing Your Play
  • Brainstorming Your Narrative

Fairy tales like Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Peter Pan and Snow White are examples of fiction.

  • True
  • False

Recurring image, word, phrase, action, idea, or object that manifests repeatedly during the course of a story.

  • Characterization
  • Motif
  • Point of View
  • Dialogue

TRUE OR FALSE: The theatrical forms of the early Filipinos was much of it being “lost on contact with the new and more aggressive culture,” than any other types of dramas.

  • True
  • False

It means the complex interrelationship between a text and other texts taken as basic to the creation or interpretation of the text.

  • Intertextuality
  • None of the above
  • Modality
  • Literature

He was a poet and labor organizer. He served as an intelligence officer of the Hukbong Bayan Laban sa Hapon (Hukbalahap), an armed group against Japanese invasion during World War II.

  • Dr. Jose Rizal
  • Andres Bonifacio
  • Amando Hernandez
  • Fernando Amorsolo

What is imagery?

  • substandard depiction of event
  • interesting dialogue
  • vivid sensory description
  • using pictures

This Latin word means to intermingle while weaving.

  • Intertexto
  • Innerio
  • Texto
  • Interio

The snowflakes danced.

  • Alliteration
  • Hyperbole
  • Personification
  • Simile

It a form of nonfiction that talks about the story of a real person’s life. It is written by the person whose the story is about.

  • Realistic Fiction
  • Autobiography
  • None of the above
  • Biography

TRUE OR FALSE: The early Philippine drama stemmed more from cultural sources

  • True
  • False

“I wandered lonely as a cloud that floats on high o’er vales and hills.” – is an example of _____________.

  • Free Verse
  • Imagery
  • Simile
  • Symbolism

The plot which chronologically shows events in their proper order from exposition to conclusion is called ___________.

  • In medias Res
  • Linear plot
  • Circular plot

It is a literary composition to be acted by players on a stage before an audience. Its successful portrayal depends on the cooperation that must exist among writers, actors, producers and audiences in accepting the limitations and the conventions of the stage.

  • Poetry
  • Drama
  • Non Fiction
  • Fiction

It requires more factual evidence for support, and presents challenges such as the pressure of time.

  • Academic Writing
  • Creative Writing

TRUE OR FALSE: The ancient Greek and Roman dramas were mostly concerned with religious ceremonials of people

  • True
  • False

"Her hair was like gravy, running brown off her head and clumping up on her shoulders." Is an example of _____

  • simile

It is language used by poets, novelists and other writers to create images in the mind of the reader.

  • Creative Writing
  • Academic Writing
  • Poetry
  • Imagery

They may be short stories, fables, vignettes, plays, novellas, or novels. Although writers may base a character on people they have met in real life, the characters and the experiences that the character faces in the story are not real.

  • Drama
  • Non Fiction
  • Poetry
  • Fiction

The plot which is structured in such a way that it ends where it has started as in a cycle is called __________.

  • Linear plot
  • In medias Res
  • Circular plot

This kind of writing is informative, instructional or persuasive.

  • Creative writing
  • Academic Writing

This concept concerns much more than simply identifying literary references or inspirations. It is now often used to describe the complex relationships that exist between works of literature.

  • None of the above
  • Modality
  • Literature
  • Intertextuality

The conflict which exists between the protagonist and supernatural beings.

  • Social Conflict
  • Metaphysical Conflict
  • Internal Conflict
  • Physical Conflict

She believed that there is a cohesive force in literature that connects all the various traditions, past and present. She gave that force a name in 1966 when she devised her theory of intertextuality.

  • David Hawkes
  • Jacques Derrida
  • Hellen Tiffin
  • Julia Kristeva

“And the trees all died. They were orange trees. I don’t know why they died, they just died.Something wrong with the soil possibly or maybe the stuff we got from the nursery wasn’t the best.” In Donald Barthelme’s The School, the tone used was __________.

  • intimate
  • condescending
  • unhappy and pessimistic
  • ironic and light

Bang! The starter’s gun— thin raindrops sprint. -Dorthi Charles Knock at a Star Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem?

  • Onomatopoeia
  • Simile
  • Metaphor
  • Alliteration

"I stick my toes in the warm and grainy sand" is an example of a sensory detail using ___________.

  • smell
  • sight
  • taste
  • touch

Ice-cold strawberries is an example of _____________.

  • Olfactory Imagery
  • Visual Imagery
  • Auditory Imagery
  • Gustatory Imagery

The sun was setting behind low, gray-blue storm clouds

  • Olfactory Imagery
  • Visual Imagery
  • Auditory Imagery
  • Gustatory Imagery

TRUE OR FALSE: Creative writing uses generalized vocabulary rather than specialized vocabulary.

  • True
  • False

The lines in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: “It seemed to me that a careful examination of the room and the lawn might possibly reveal some traces of this mysterious individual.” Sherlock Holmes is speaking to his close friend Dr. Watson. His diction is _________.

  • Informal
  • Formal
  • Slang
  • Colloquial

My teacher has eyes in the back of her head.

  • Metaphor
  • Idiom
  • Personification
  • Simile

TRUE OR FALSE: “Let’s meet at 12 midnight.” - 12 midnight is an example of redundancy.

  • True
  • False

Keep your writing complex. Try to describe something that is diffuse or abstract to make it more appealing.

  • True
  • False

These is/are interruptions that writers do to insert past events, in order to provide background or context to the current events of a narrative. Writers allow their readers to gain insight into a character’s motivations, and provide a background to a current conflict.

  • Symbol
  • Flashbacks
  • Voice
  • Stream-of-consciousness

This play tells about how he learns and realizes his foolishness of gambling. The colors red and white indicates the bets of each player.

  • Sa Pula, Sa Puti
  • The Highwayman
  • Da Vinci Code
  • Tinubuang Lupa

The highest point of the story, during which the readers know how the conflict will be resolved.

  • Exposition
  • Climax
  • Resolution
  • Falling Action

The point of view in which the narrator is an all-knowing and all-seeing observer who tells everything about the characters. (speech, actions, thoughts, and emotions)

  • Objective third-person POV
  • Selective third-person POV
  • Autobiographical/ first-person POV
  • Omniscient third-person POV

"As John stepped down in the old staircase, he heared the cracking of wood splitting punctuated like an exclamation point. He rapidly shuts the dimming fire in his glass lamp."

  • Sight
  • Sight
  • Hearing

The phone rang loudly. "RING, RING, RING!"

  • Idiom
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Personfication
  • Metaphor

TRUE OR FALSE: Creative writing is written to entertain and educate.

  • True
  • False

This kind of writing is Fictional and imaginative.

  • Academic Writing
  • Creative writing

It is generally given by an actor before the play begins. Its purpose is to present an explanatory poem or speech that introduces information that is needed to start the play.

  • Atmosphere
  • Prologue
  • Complications
  • Epilogue

“Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both”, these lines came from Robert Frost’s ___________.

  • After - Apple Picking
  • Mending Wall
  • The Road not Taken
  • Fire an Ice

A writing that needs to be structured and executed adhering to a series of guidelines.

  • Creative Writing
  • Technical Writing

Anna hates the juicy tartness of oranges. She prefers eating salty chips instead. The italicized words are example of sensory details using __________.

  • smell
  • sight
  • touch
  • taste

The quote: "Your food stinks like a hundred-year-old patty" is a type of an olfactory imagery.

  • True
  • False

This is when you allow conversations to take tangents. For example, in a discussion of why the protagonist’s girlfriend broke up with him, there might be a sequence of two or three lines where the speakers argue about how long they’d been dating in the first place.

  • Deciding on Your Play’s Structure
  • Brainstorming Your Narrative
  • Writing Your Play

This presents the final outcomes of the struggle, sometimes referred to as the catastrophe which is the end of the struggle, but it is necessarily a tragic ending.

  • denouement
  • rising action
  • preliminary exposition
  • falling action

The idea or concept of the author expressed in a concise statement; referred to as the message of the story, it concretizes the abstract ides the writer wants to impart. This is called _____________.

  • Point of View
  • Setting
  • Plot
  • Theme

There was an ovation when the minister rose up to speak. This sentence has/is ____________.

  • wrong modifier
  • no error
  • Redundant
  • sentence fragments

"Elaine was amazed as she glimpse the deep blue of the ocean from afar. She opened her car window and breathe in the salty beach air ."

  • Taste
  • Touch
  • Hearing
  • Smell
  • Sight

The character who serves as a contrast to the protagonist or any other character in the story.

  • Antagonist
  • Static
  • Foil
  • Confidant

It uses metric rules for amount of words, amount of paragraphs, amount of rhymes. This also use grammatical rules, as types of rhymes. This type of specific form is called ________.

  • Non- Conventional Form
  • Conventional Form

This sonnet of Elizabeth Browning expressed love for her spouse; specifically, to Robert Browning.

  • Sonnet 26
  • Sonnet 43
  • Sonnet 14
  • Sonnet 44

A form of fiction that pertains to the actions of the gods and/or goddesses. Its chacacters are super-natural beings with human emotions and qualoties.

  • Folktales
  • Historical Fiction
  • Classics
  • Myths

Life is like a box of chocolate. You never know what you're going to get.

  • Simile
  • Personification
  • Metaphor
  • Idiom

The sun kissed my cold face.

  • personification

This type of poetry does not follow any rules. Their creation is completely in the hands of the author. Rhyming, syllable count, punctuation, number of lines, number of stanzas, and line formation can be done however the author wants in order to convey the idea.

  • Epic
  • Free Verse
  • Sonnet
  • Ballad

The conflict which exists between the protagonist and the antagonist.

  • Internal Conflict
  • Metaphysical Conflict
  • Physical Conflict
  • Social Conflict

TRUE OR FALSE: Creative writing uses figurative, symbolic or even vague language.

  • True
  • False

The playwright must confine his locations to scenes that can be constructed on the stage and limited to as a few changes as possible.

  • Characters
  • Themes
  • Conflicts
  • Setting

The wind stood up, and gave a shout; He whistled on his fingers, and Kicked the withered leaves about, And thumped the branches with his hand, And said he’ll kill, and kill, and kill; And so he will! And so he will! - James Stephens Knock at a Star Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem?

  • Oxymoron
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Simile
  • Personification
  • When James Stephens says, “The wind stood up, and gave a shout / He whistled on his fingers”, he is using personification.
  • He is giving human characteristics, such as shouting and whistling on fingers, to the wind.

The initial part of the plot in which the setting and the characters are introduced.

  • Climax
  • Rising Action
  • Resolution
  • Exposition

On a flat road runs the well-trained runner, He is lean and sinewy with muscular legs, He is thinly clothed, he leans forward as he runs, With lightly closed fists and arms partially raised. - Walt Whitman Knock at a Star Identify two imageries used in the poem "The Runner".

  • lightly closed fists and arms partially raised

Technique that allows the reader to see the continuous, chaotic, and half-formed thoughts, memories, senses, images, and reflections that constitutes a character's consciousness.

  • Symbol
  • Flashbacks
  • Stream-of-consciousness
  • Voice

A practical lesson about right and wrong conduct contained in the narrative; it is stated directly in fables, but it is usually implied in the other stories.

  • Values
  • Time
  • Moral
  • Locale

It means the superfluity or using words unnecessarily or using words for a second time.

  • Parallelism
  • Redundancy
  • Tone
  • Diction

Which of the following is not a type of imagery?

  • Visual Imagery
  • Tactile imagery
  • Olfactory imagery
  • Extrasensory imagery

This determines the actor’s movements, choice of costumes, as well as the behavior of characters and interpretations of their speeches.

  • Developing of Action
  • Atmosphere
  • Technical Divisions
  • Stage Directions

There was a loud "THUMP" coming from upstairs. "THUMP","THUMP", "THUMP"!"

  • Metaphor
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Idiom
  • Personfication

It can be accomplished through a series of crises and a major crisis or climax, foreshadowing, surprise or use of the unexpected, withholding information, disguise, and the intervention of chance or fate.

  • Dramatic Emphasis
  • Suspense
  • Complications
  • Preliminary Exposition

TRUE OR FALSE: In academic writing the most of the part is self-created, although the idea might be inspired but in creative writing the facts are to be obliged and the note is delivered from leading on what previously other greats have concluded.

  • True
  • False

A French styled poem with nineteen lines, composed of three–line stanza, with five tercets and a final quatrain. It uses refrain at the first and third lines of each

  • Ballad
  • Limerick
  • Epic
  • stanza.
  • Villanelle

The boy shouted, “Madam, I’m Adam!”

  • Alliteration
  • Palindrome
  • Oxymoron
  • Irony

“Ah Sunflower, weary of time, Who countest the steps of the sun; Seeking after that sweet golden clime Where the traveler’s journey is done;” - Ah Sunflower (By William Blake) is an example of ____________.

  • Haiku
  • Imagery
  • Symbolism
  • Free Verse

They are portrayed by actors who speak the dialogue and carry out the action of the play.

  • Plot
  • Themes
  • Conflicts
  • Characters

Hyperbole is a type of figurative language that shows the likeness of something to inanimate objects. It usually uses "like" or "as"

  • True
  • False

This is a popular song in almost every struggle, from the anti-U.S. protests of the 1920s and ‘30s, to the resistance movement against the Japanese invasion in the ‘40s, the First Quarter Storm of the ‘70s and the 1986 People Power.

  • Pag-ibig sa Bayan
  • Ang Bayan Ko
  • Lupang Hinirang
  • Pilipinas Kong Mahal

Also known as “the art of making things up". It is an art of sorts - the art of making things up.

  • Academic Writing
  • Creative Writing
  • Imagery
  • Poetry

A literature that evokes a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience or a specific emotional response through language chosen and arranged for its meaning, sound, and rhythm.

  • Fiction
  • None of the above
  • Poetry
  • Non Fiction

The leaves danced in the wind

  • Metaphor
  • Simile
  • Idiom
  • Personfication

The character upon whom the protagonist confides or relies for support.

  • Static
  • Confidant
  • Foil
  • Antagonist

"Ice-cold strawberries" is an example of _______________.

  • Visual Imagery
  • Tactile Imagery
  • Gustatory Imagery
  • Auditory Imagery

Glass of sweet yet bitter lemonade.

  • Gustatory Imagery
  • Olfactory Imagery
  • Auditory Imagery
  • Visual Imagery

“And the trees all died. They were orange trees. I don’t know why they died, they just died. Something wrong with the soil possibly or maybe the stuff we got from the nursery wasn’t the best.” In Donald Barthelme’s The School, the tone used was __________.

  • unhappy and pessimistic
  • ironic and light
  • condescending
  • intimate

The part of the plot in which the conflict is resolve. It can also be called as the conclusion. It is the last part of the plot which gives the story some finality.

  • Resolution
  • Exposition
  • Falling Action
  • Rising Action

TRUE OR FALSE: Humor, satire might be the useful essences in creative writing but such thoughts or ideas have no link with the technical writing.

  • True
  • False

Charles Dickens in Great Expectations uses a description of weather in Chapter 39. It is an example of ____________.

  • Characterization
  • Dialogue
  • Point of View
  • Foreshadowing

It refers to the choice of words and style of expression that an author makes and uses in a work of literature. It can have a great effect on the tone of a piece of literature, and how readers perceive the characters.

  • Parallelism
  • Tone
  • Redundancy
  • Diction

Ice crackled and pinged against the family room window is an example of _____________.

  • Auditory Imagery
  • Olfactory Imagery
  • Gustatory Imagery
  • Visual Imagery

The process and execution of creating a fully rounded, complex, and lifelike character within your fictional writing with the purpose of making readers invested in them and their life or journey is called character development.

  • True
  • False

Her cheeks are big red apples from the cold.

  • metaphor

It doesn't use specialized vocabulary, such like scientific terms and other are used yet it goes with slang or evocative phrases or even something which can be perceived well by the audience.

  • Creative Writing
  • Technical Writing

The time and place in which the events of a narrative take place. It can function as a main force that the characters encounter, such as a tornado or flood, or a setting can play a minor role such as setting the mood.

  • Setting
  • Plot
  • Character
  • Dialogue

Carl Sandburg’s poem “Fog” is an example of ____________.

  • Free Verse
  • Limerick
  • Ballad
  • Haiku

One of the techniques in writing sensory details is stating what the thing does. Tell whether when and where do you find it or how do you know it’s there?

  • True
  • False

TRUE OR FALSE: The ancient Greek and Roman dramas were mostly concerned with religious ceremonials of people.

  • True
  • False

A type of narrative poem in which a story often talks about folk or legendary tales. It may take the form of a moral lesson or a song.

  • Limerick
  • Epic
  • Sonnet
  • Ballad

The chiming of the bells... The boom of the explosion.. is an example of _______.

  • Onomatopoeia
  • Personification
  • Metaphor
  • Idiom

A type of poetry that is composed of 3 lines, each a phrase. The first line typically has 5 syllables, second line has 7 and the 3rd and last line repeats another 5.

  • Ballad
  • Sonnet
  • Tanaga
  • Haiku

Stance from which the story is told.

  • Antagonist
  • Dialogue
  • Point of View
  • Plot

It is the process and execution of creating a fully rounded, complex, and lifelike character within your fictional writing with the purpose of making readers invested in them and their life or journey.

  • Plot Development
  • None of the above
  • Character Development
  • Academic Writing

This poem has no set meter; that is to say there is no rhyming scheme present, and the poem doesn’t follow a set pattern.

  • Haiku
  • Ballad
  • Free Verse
  • Limerick

The word “Wuthering,” which means “stormy,” represents the wild nature of inhabitants. Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights presents almost every character, house, surroundings, and events in ___________ .

  • Symbolic Perspective
  • Dramatic Monologue
  • Soliloquy
  • Monologue

Sweet aroma of baking corn bread - cinnamon-scented candle is an example of ____________.

  • Auditory Imagery
  • Visual Imagery
  • Gustatory Imagery
  • Olfactory Imagery

The phrase "her shadow shaky behind a slight flame stemming from a candle she carried", is an example of a ________________.

  • Gustatory Imagery
  • Visual Imagery
  • Auditory Imagery
  • Tactile Imagery

A character who remains the same kind of person as the story progresses

  • Foil
  • Static
  • Antagonist
  • Confidant

TRUE OR FALSE: Academic writing uses specialized vocabulary.

  • True
  • False

TRUE OR FALSE: The origin of the drama is deep-rooted in the religious predispositions of mankind

  • True
  • False

Her hair was like gravy, running brown off her head and clumping up on her shoulders.

  • Metaphor
  • Simile
  • Personification
  • Idiom

These are words or phrases that depart from straightforward literal language. It is often used and crafted for emphasis, freshness, expression, or clarity.

  • Imagery
  • Figure of Speech
  • Academic Writing
  • Diction

The part of the plot in which the conflict is resolve. It can also be called as the conclusion. It last part of the plot which gives the story some finality.

  • Rising Action
  • Exposition
  • Falling Action
  • Resolution

These are details that include sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste. Most writers employ the five senses to engage a reader's interest and create a gripping memorable story.

  • sensory details

It is the comparison of two unlike things or expressions, sometimes using the verb “to be,” and not using like or as (as in a simile).

  • Hyperbole
  • Idiom
  • Simile
  • Personification

TRUE OR FALSE: The Romans developed a new method, wherein the stories of the Gospel were explained through the living pictures. The performers acted out the story in a dumb show.

  • True
  • False

The point of view in which the narrator is an all-knowing and all-seeing observer who tells everything about the characters.(speech, actions, thoughts, and emotions)

  • Autobiographical/ first-person POV
  • Objective third-person POV
  • Omniscient third-person POV
  • Selective third-person POV

The information is merely based on facts.

  • Creative Writing
  • Technical Writing

A generally implied reference to characters, scenes, plot elements, etc. that appear in another work is called __________.

  • Parody
  • Imagery
  • Pastiche
  • Allusion

Her cheeks are big red apples from the cold

  • Idiom
  • Simile
  • Personfication
  • Metaphor

In this part, you should have a sense of how you want to structure it. The one-act play runs straight through without any intermissions, and is a good starting point for people new to playwriting before writing the play.

  • Writing Your Play
  • Deciding on Your Play’s Structure
  • Brainstorming Your Narrative

"Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.”

  • alliteration

A short rhyming poem with 14 lines.

  • Ballad
  • Epic
  • Sonnet
  • Free Verse

In this part, you outline your acts and scenes. You make sure each scene’s events build toward the next scene to achieve plot development.

  • Writing Your Play
  • Brainstorming Your Narrative
  • Deciding on Your Play’s Structure

This writing is rigid, procedural, purposed purely to convey knowledge, data and information. In fact, it is orderly, organized and follows a formula.

  • Creative Writing
  • Technical Writing

He is also known as Huseng Batute. He is popular for his traditional forms of poetry.

  • Jose Corazon de Jesus
  • Jose Garcia-Villa
  • Jose Protacio Rizal
  • Jose Maria-Panganiban

This keeps the plot moving forward must have some basis in real life. They develop through series of crises that move in waves of heightened emotion, all moving upwards to a peak of crisis or climax where the action reverses from the previous rising action and the events go for or against the protagonist towards a final outcome.

  • Dramatic Emphasis
  • Complications
  • Suspense
  • Preliminary Exposition

"The leaves danced in the wind."

  • personification

Every scene or conversation between characters must have a purpose; dialogue must not wander away from the major concerns of the plot nor must it be directed towards superfluous or unrelated detail.

  • Preliminary Exposition
  • Complications
  • Dramatic Emphasis
  • Suspense

TRUE OR FALSE: The creative writing is for general audience or for masses but technical writing is for specific audience.

  • True
  • False

The arrangement of events in a narrative, carefully crafted by an author is called _________.

  • Character
  • Setting
  • Dialogue
  • Plot

In this part, you understand the difference between plot and story. The narrative of your play is made up of the plot and the story — two discrete elements that must be developed together to create a play that holds your audience’s attention.

  • Brainstorming Your Narrative
  • Writing Your Play
  • Deciding on Your Play’s Structure

TRUE OR FALSE: Creative writing is objective rather than subjective

  • True
  • False

TRUE OR FALSE: The origin of the drama is deep-rooted in the religious predispositions of mankind.

  • True
  • False

A five-line witty poem with a distinctive rhythm. The first, second and fifth lines, the longer lines, rhyme. The third and fourth shorter lines rhyme. (A-A-B-B-A).

  • Ballad
  • Epic
  • Sonnet
  • Limerick

A French styled poem with nineteen lines, composed of three–line stanza, with five tercets and a final quatrain. It uses refrain at the first and third lines of each stanza.

  • Epic
  • VIllanelle
  • Ballad
  • Limerick

A form of fiction that pertains to the actions of the gods and/or goddesses. Its characters are super-natural beings with human emotions and qualities.

  • Myths
  • Classics
  • Folktales
  • Historical Fiction

The POV in which the narrator is both an omniscient and an objective observer; it is a combination of omniscient third-person and objective third person points of view.

  • Omniscient third-person POV
  • Autobiographical/ first-person POV
  • Selective third-person POV

The Titanic was said to be unsinkable but sank on its first voyage.

  • Irony
  • Palindrome
  • Oxymoron
  • Alliteration

“And the trees all die. They were orange trees. I don’t know why they died, they just die. Something wrong with the soil possibly or maybe the stuff we got from the nursery wasn’t the best.” In Donald Barthelme’s The School, the tone used was __________.

  • unhappy and pessimistic
  • condescending
  • ironic and light
  • intimate

John Keats’ To Autumn is an ode rich with ____________.

  • Haiku
  • Free Verse
  • Imagery
  • Symbolism